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ROTC
Leadership

CADRE

CPT Manuel Antonio Orozco Hernandez
Assistant Professor of Military Science University of Puerto Rico, Cayey
manuel.orozco@upr.edu
manuel.a.orozco.mil@mail.mil
(787) 263-4480
(910) 922-9002

The Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is one of four ways to receive an Appointment as a United States Army Officer. Although West Point, Officer’s Candidate School, and the Direct Commissioning process serve as the other three options, the 272 College ROTC Departments across the nation annually commission over half of the Army’s 2nd Lieutenants.

In terms of a general overview, the ROTC curriculum is divided into two distinct courses: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. Each course differs in regard to who can participate and also in regard to one’s overall military obligation.

The Basic Course is comprised of the freshman and sophomore level classes and does not require any military obligation. At most universities, these classes are considered electives and only meet once a week for approximately 1 ½ to 2 hours. The Basic Course covers topics such as Organization of the Army; Military Traditions and Courtesies; Basic Leadership Skills; Decision Making Process; Map Reading Skills; Introduction to Small Unit Tactics; and Basic Soldier Skills. In order to enroll in the Basic Course, an individual must:

-Be a full time student at the University of Cayey
-Not be a Conscientious Objector
-Be of Good Moral Character
-Not have any Tattoos specifically prohibited by Army policy
-Be a U.S. Citizen
-Be in good physical condition
-The Advance Course is comprised of junior and senior level classes and requires students to commit to a military obligation prior to entering the course. Once enrolled in the Advance Course, Cadets participate in academic classes and leadership labs each semester and also attend a 30 day Leadership Development Assessment Course located at Ft. Knox, KY, during the summer of their junior/senior year. In order to enroll in the Advance Course, an individual must:
Meet all of the previous requirements to enter the Basic Course.
-Not have any civil convictions, adverse adjudications, or court marshal convictions other than minor traffic violations less than $250.00.
-Not have more than 3 dependents.
-Never have used drugs; or be a self admitted limited/experimental user of drugs who has not used within 6 months of contracting.
-Sign a loyalty oath.
-If prior service, have an honorable discharge from the Armed Services with a qualifying RE code of 1 on DD Form 214.
-Meet one of the following criteria: have credit for CIMI 3011/3012/3021/3022/4011/4012/4021/4022, complete Cadet Command’s Leadership Training Course, or complete Basic Training in one of the Armed Forces.
-Have a college GPA of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale.
-Score at least 180 points with 60 points in each event on a single Army Physical Fitness Test.
-Pass the ECL (English Comprehensive Level) exam with 90 points or better before commissioning.
- Pass the OPI (Oral Proficiency Interview) with 2+/2 points or better before commissioning.
-Successfully pass a Department of Defense Medical Evaluation Review Board physical. The most common non-waiver disqualifiers during this physical are:

Documented asthma after the age of 13.

ADD/ADHD, depression treatment, or academic skills disorders within the past 12 months;

Ulcerative colitis, crohn’s disease, scoliosis-curvature of the spine in excess of 30 degrees, or prior service with a permanent profile.

-Be younger than the age of 39 at time of commissioning.

-Upon completion of the Advance Course and successful graduation from the university, Cadets receive their commission as a United States Army Officer and subsequently begin a career in either the Active Army or Reserve/National Guard.

RECRUITMENT

Joining ROTC can be a life changing experience. Keep reading to find out how.

WHY JOIN ROTC?

The program can be completed in just two years by attending a 5-week Basic Camp.

If you are interested in the Reserves or National Guard then you can complete the ROTC program in 2 years while you serve with your unit. You will also collect the stipend, book money, and full tuition.

You'll be commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant the day you graduate and can be making the civilian equivalency of $68,000 within your first four years on active duty.

Financial aid incentives.

Receive a monthly stipend (tax-free) topping out at $500 for seniors, plus $600 a year for books.

HOW TO JOIN

-Meet all of the previous requirements to enter the Basic Course.

-If prior service, have an honorable discharge from the Armed Services with a qualifying RE code of 1 on DD Form 214.

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION

Army ROTC awards hundreds of scholarships, available at over 600 schools. Army ROTC scholarships pay full tuition and required fees. They're awarded on merit -- like academic achievements, extracurricular activities, and personal interviews. Scholarship winners receive a stipend ($300 freshman, $350 sophomore, $450 junior, $500 senior) for each academic month, plus an allowance for books and other educational items. If you're a non-scholarship student, you can still receive the stipend as a contracted Cadet.

If you're selected to receive a scholarship, you will have a commitment to the Army after completing the program. You can fulfill the commitment by either serving as an officer part time in the Army National Guard, Army Reserve, or full time on active duty.

Additional information can be located at: http://www.goarmy.com/rotc/scholarships.html

ENROLLMENT DOCUMENTS

All student registered for Military Science (CIMI) classes are referred to as Cadets.  A Cadet is a trainee that is enrolled in a military officer producing program.  The ROTC program has several categories of Cadets enrolled in the program: Participating Cadets, Enrolled Cadets, and Contracted Cadets.

Participating Cadets- Registered for the CIMI class through the university and responsible for attending all classroom activities.

Enrolled Cadets - Has completed all documents listed in the "ROTC Enrollment Packet."  These students are eligible to attend all extra curricular activities associated with ROTC, such as: Physical fitness training, leadership labs, and Field Training Exercises (FTX) which include rifle ranges, land navigation training, obstacle courses, and leader reaction courses.

Contracted Cadets- These students have completed all documents listed in the "Contracting Packet" and have been identified as possessing the character and attributes necessary of an officer candidate. They have signed the Army enlistment contract (DD 4/1, DD 4/2) and ROTC contract (DA 597-3 or DA 597) and are working toward becoming an Army Officer upon graduating with a bachelor's degree.

CONTRACTING PACKET

Application Checklist – This is a checklist of every form needed in order to contract with the ROTC program.

104-R- This form is an academic plan / worksheet. It should contain all of the classes you need to complete your bachelor’s degree, as well as, all of the required ROTC classes. You ROTC instructor will advise you on the best method for getting this document completed.

It will require a signature from your academic advisor acknowledging courses needed to complete your degree. This Excel Spreadsheet has three tabs / pages that must be completed. Page two, block number 12 must be signed by your academic advisor.

139-R – This is a cadet enrollment record form. The form has 6 tabs/pages in the bottom left corner; however, only the first 2 tabs need to be completed for contracting purposes. The following is a list of items that may help you when filling out the form:
Block # 9: DOB - Date of Birth
Block # 10: POB – Place of Birth
Block # 24: Next of Kin- who would we contact in an
Emergency.
Block # 25a / 26a: FICE code – do not fill this in Tab/page #2: Initial one box in each section (blocks #42-46) on the second tab. You must sign tab/page #2.

SAL Sheet – Scholar Athlete Leader sheet. You only need to provide hair color, eye color, and blood type at the bottom of the form.
Language questionnaire – answer each question/section.

PME Requirements – Read all the PME Requirements and sign the second page saying you understand the requirements.

Dental Form – Need to know the location of your dental x-rays; for emergency purposes only. You are the person that signs this form. ***Do not bring me your dental x-rays.

DD 93 – This is a Record of emergency data. Fill out the first two pages; if you need any instruction for how to fill out any part of these forms pages 3 and 4 contain instruction.

SGLI – The Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance Election and Certificate. Only need page two filled out. The additional forms are provided to ensure you understand the purpose and how to complete the form. Fill out your personal information at the top of page 2, elect if you want the life insurance, or want to reduce the amount, and list beneficiaries. Sign and date the bottom of the form.

SF 1199A – Direct Deposit form needs to be filled out and turned in in-order to receive direct deposits. You only need to fill out and print page one.

Section 1 (A,D, & E): completed by the Cadet and must sign first signature block in that section.

Section 3: Completed by the students bank official. Must have bank official’s signature; only exception is if you bank with USAA in Texas.

W4 – Tax form (with holdings: current year)

DD Form 2058 – State of Legal Residency Form. Fill in name, SSN, and your legal mailing address. Sign and date the bottom.

CC 136 – Government Sponsored Benefits for ROTC Cadets. Sign and date the bottom of the form. This indicates that you have read and understand the information on the form.

CC 137 – Authorization for access to student records.
Fill out part 1 if you would want to authorize an ROTC instructor to speak with your parents about your performance, to include grades, should they contact us.

Fill out part 2 if you do not want us to discuss your performance with your parents/legal guardian.

3425-R – Medical fitness statement. Go to your physician and have that physician fill out this form stating you have no medical conditions or physical impairments that may hinder your participation in ROTC.

DD Form 2005 – Privacy Statement for healthcare Records, Read form and sign and date the bottom.

Pre-contract Checklist – This checklist will be completed in conjunction with your ROTC instructor at the time of contracting; it does not need to be completed prior to contracting.

Enrollment Packet: The five documents listed below must be completed if the student wants to partake in the extra curricula activities associated with ROTC, such as: Physical fitness training, leadership labs, and Field Training Exercise (FTX) which include rifle ranges, land navigation training, obstacle courses, and leader reaction courses. 

1. Proof of Citizenship- Students must provide official documentation demonstrating that they are a citizen of the United States.  This can be completed by producing either a U.S. Birth Certificate or unexpired U.S. Passport.

2. CC 139-R - This is a cadet enrollment record form.  The form has 6 tabs/pages in the bottom left corner; however, only the first 2 tabs need to be completed for contracting purposes. The following is a list of items that may help you when filling out the form:

Block # 9: DOB - Date of Birth
Block # 10: POB – Place of Birth
Block # 24: Next of Kin- who would we contact in an emergency
Block # 25a / 26a: FICE code – do not fill this in
Tab /page #2: Initial one box in each section (blocks#42-46) on the second tab. You must sign tab/page #2 where is states   "All information given on this form is correct to the best of my knowledge."

3. CC 137 – Authorization for access to student records. 
Fill out part 1 if you would want to authorize an ROTC instructor to speak with your parents about your performance, to include grades, should they contact us.

Fill out part 2 if you do not want us to discuss your performance with your parents/legal guardian.

4. CC 136 - Government Sponsored Benefits for ROTC Cadets.  Sign and date the bottom of the form. This indicates that you have read and understand the information on the form.

5. DA 3425-R - Medical fitness statement. Go to your physician and have that physician fill out this form saying you have no medical conditions or physical impairments that may hinder your participation in ROTC.

ROTC INFORMATION

ROTC had its beginnings in the 19th century, when a handful of colleges offered military instruction to students. By the time the Civil War began, everyone could see the need to develop a source of military leaders and the college campus was a logical place to find those who could qualify.

In 1862, the Land Grant Act was passed authorizing grants of public land to state colleges that offered military training for all able bodied male students. As a result of the legislation, 105 colleges and universities were offering military instruction by the early 1900's. But as our nation became increasingly involved in international affairs, the need for a reserve corps of training military officers was more apparent.

In 1916, Congress recognized the need for an expanded military reserve to supplement the National Guard, and it passed the National Defense Act. The National Defense Act provided for the establishment of the Officers' Reserve Corps, to be composed of men trained in ROTC and in Army training camps. These officers not only served in World War I, but also went on to form the basis of the Officers' Reserve Corps in the 1930s.

Consequently, when World War II broke out, ROTC was able to provide the necessary military leadership required for the Army to mobilize. Within six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, more than 56,000 Army ROTC officers were serving on active duty. By the end of the war, more than 100,000 ROTC officers had served our country.

Later, in Korea and Vietnam, Army ROTC graduates reaffirmed our national commitments to a defense force, led in a large part by citizen soldiers who had been prepared for leadership campuses of our colleges and universities. Because of the critical role played Army ROTC during these periods of conflict, Congress added additional strength to the program with the passage of the ROTC Vitalization Act of 1964.

The act provided for the establishment of Army ROTC scholarships, the creation of the two-year program, and the increase in the amount of money ROTC students receive. These additional incentives stimulates enrollment in the program and introduced the rewards of military life to thousands of qualified young students.

POLICY

The Bull Company is forward-looking, battle-focused, team-oriented, continuously improving, and capable of accurately assessing ourselves. We create and maintain a climate where both cadre and cadets feel as though they truly have the opportunity to “be all that they can be”. We respect and appreciate individual differences. We work smart, have fun, and go home and spend quality time with our families and/or friends. Each member of this team always feels empowered to learn, grow, and excel. The end state of living this vision is commissioned officers that will lead our Army with distinction and Soldiers that feel proud to refer to you as “My Lieutenant”.

COURSES (MSI)

CIMI 3011 Military Organizations: Introduces you to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. The key objective of this semester is to begin an introduction of critical thinking skills that will enable you to make important decisions based on information. You will learn how the personal development skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, mental/physical resiliency, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. Fall semester only.

CIMI 3012 Basic Leadership and Management: MSCI 102 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills.  You will explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies. The key objective of this semester is to continue to develop critical thinking skills and explore in more detail the Army's leadership philosophy and learn fundamental military concepts. Spring semester only.

COURSES(MSII)

CIMI 3021 Studies in Decision Making: The key objective of this semester is to continue to develop critical thinking skills necessary to making decisions based on information. Additionally, this course will continue to develop knowledge of the Army's leadership philosophies and integrate this knowledge into tactical strategies and team development. Aspects of personal motivation and team building are practiced planning, executing and assessing team exercises. The focus continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Fall semester only.

CIMI 3022 Land Navigation and Tactics: The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders.  The key learning objective of this semester is to explore leadership incorporating terrain analysis, tactical strategies, and team development. Critical thinking skills will continue to be the focus along with further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. Cadets develop greater self-awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. Spring semester only.

CPOURSES(MSIII)

CIMI 4011 Unit Level Command Response: Cadets are challenged to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive team leadership skills as they are presented with the demands of the ROTC Cadet Leadership
Course (CLC).  Challenging scenarios related to small unit tactical operations are used to develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills.  Cadets will receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership abilities. The overall objective of this course is to integrate the principles and practices of effective leadership, military operations and personal development in order to adequately prepare students for CLC. Fall semester only.

CIMI 4012 Terrain Analysis: Skills in decision-making, persuading and motivating team members when "under fire" are explored, evaluated, and developed.  Aspects of military operations are reviewed as a means of preparing for the ROTC Cadet Leadership Course (CLC). Cadets are expected to apply basic principles of the Law of Land Warfare, Army training, and motivation to troop leading procedures. Emphasis is also placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency in Garrison operation orders. Cadets are evaluated on what they "know" and "do" as leaders and will analyze and apply leadership principles to complex and varied Army operations. Spring semester only.

COURSES(MSIV)

CIMI 4021 Basic Officer Course Prep: Cadets learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer and apply the Military Decision Making Process, Army Writing Style, and the Army's Training Management and METL Development processes during weekly Training Meetings to plan, execute and assess battalion training events.  Cadets learn to safely conduct training by understanding and employing the Composite Risk Management Process. The overall objective of this course is to prepare the student for success at the Basic Officer Leader Course (BOLC) B. Fall semester only.

CIMI 4022 Advanced Leadership and Management: Cadets explsores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the full spectrum operations (FSO). You will examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism.  You also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing you for BOLC B, and your first unit of assignment.  It uses case studies, scenarios, and "What Now, Lieutenant?" exercises to prepare you to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as a commissioned officer in the United States Army. Spring semester only.

CAMP

Leader's Training Course (LTC): An intensive practical application of leadership and military skills to satisfy basic course requirements (CIMI 3021 and 3022). Conducted at Fort Knox, KY for approximately six weeks. Summer only.

Cadet Leadership Course (CLC). An intensive practical application of leadership and military skills for Advanced Course students (CIMI 4011 and 4012). 29 day assessment program conducted at Fort Knox, Kentucky for all Advanced Course cadets from colleges and universities throughout the United States. Summer only.

Other requirements include:

Successfully completing the Combat Water Survival Test (CWST).

Enrolling and completing the US Military History course.

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